The Story of the Victoria Ohnsorgs How Three Women Became Two, Then One and How They Became Three Again. Which One Was Joseph Schindler’s Second Wife and Third Partner?

Once upon a time there were three women known as Victoria Ohnsorg who were all about the same age. This is a story of how these three women became two, then one and how they became three again. Ultimately answering the question: Who was Joseph Schindler’s second wife and third partner?

It all started with The Schindler Girls, as they were known to the descendants of William Schindler (their father). They were my three great aunts, sisters of my grandfather, Hubert Schindler and they were granddaughters of Joseph Schindler and Carolina Lux. To view a pedigree chart beginning with William click here (opens in a new window).

The Schindler Girls Mockup 2The Schindler Girls

They never married, they lived together for their lifetimes. As adults they owned a home in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota and it was spotless. They were the de facto keepers of the family history. The oldest, Afra was born 9 January 1891, Hedwig 24 December 1891 [No, it is not a typo they were born the same year eleven and half months apart.] and the youngest Eleanor 20 February 1901.1 Growing up, I heard one story repeatedly about The Schindler Girls mainly because it involved me and horrified my mom. Even after 60 plus years she still talks about how she was horrified and embarrassed.

It was October 1957, I wasn’t even a year old and we had been transferred for the second time since my birth. On leave from the military, and between assignments Mom, Dad and I ventured, on a road trip from Ellsworth Air Force Base (AFB), Rapid City, South Dakota across country to New York and back to California before reporting to Elmendorf AFB in Alaska.

Ann Road Trip Mockup 1
Ann C Gilchrest 1957

We stopped in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota and stayed with The Schindler Girls. I had at best a month’s experience walking. You know the time when you wobble side to side and your balance isn’t spot on, adults gasp and you laugh when you land on your butt —  that is, until you realize the adults think you’re supposed to hurt. Well, I wobbled and grabbed a lamp on a table and tumbled into the wall creating a childs fist sized hole. Mom was horrified. Her daughter had punched a hole in the revered Schindler Girls wall. We all went to bed that night, mom still horrified, dad saying, “well stuff happens.” When we awoke the next morning the hole in the wall had magically disappeared. According to mom it looked like nothing happened. That was the way of The Schindler Girls. They never told mom how the wall was repaired, and she never asked. It just wasn’t done. On the other hand, as an adult, I had no qualms about asking, when I had the opportunity to meet the two younger Schindler Girls. Afra, the oldest had died my senior year in high school. I told the story I had heard my entire life they both laughed and filled me in. They had called one of their male friends and he came over late that night and repaired the wall. Now that is a true friend.

The merging of the three Victorias essentially began with the photograph below. It is a different version of the one I used in my last post but appears to have been taken the same day.

Schindler Siblings mockupEight of Joseph Schindler’s Children

One of the first family group sheets (a form used to show a family group, parents and their children) created in the late 1970’s or early 1980’s for Joseph Schindler and Carolina Lux originated from how the eight Schindler siblings in the above photograph were identified. Two of them were incorrectly identified and not in the way you might think.

The Labeling:

Standing: Will. Schindler our dad, Bertha Schwartz–daughter of second wife, Uncle Frank Schindler. Sitting: Aunt Mary ‘Schindler’ Sondag, Aunt Augusta ‘Schindler’ Muyres, Uncle Joseph Schindler, Anna Schwartz–daughter of second wife and Aunt Christine ‘Schindler’ Van Sloun.

First Family Group Sheet Mockup 1
First Joseph Schindler Family Group Sheet

The two siblings incorrectly identified are Bertha [Albertine] Schwartz and Anna Schwartz. When the photograph was taken their names really were Bertha/Albertine Schindler Schwartz and Anna Schindler Schwartz. The incorrect identification was “the daughter[’s] of second wife.” They are not the daughters of Joseph’s second wife but are Joseph’s daughters. Albertine and Anna married two Schwartz brothers, Peter and John respectively.2 It would take almost 20 years before the incorrect identification was corrected.

The Schindler Girls explained that their Grandfather Joseph Schindler, Sr. married a second time to Victoria Ohnsorg Schwartz. She had two children Bertha and Anna who never married. That first family group sheet made note that Joseph had a second wife but no further information was added. After all, the information came from The Schindler Girls, and they should know who their aunts and uncles were.

1860 & 70 Census Schindler Mockup 11860 & 1870 US Census’s Joseph Schindler Family

Eventually my mom and her sisters located the Schindler Family in the 18603 and 18704 censuses. Children were added to the family group sheet. Birth dates from church records and deaths from grave stones were written in. During all those years Joseph’s second wife was still Victoria Ohnsorg Schwartz and the two women labeled as Anna Schwartz and Bertha Schwartz were still her children. Despite evidence from the censuses that reveled Joseph & Carolina had what appeared to be daughters by the same names, Anna and Albertine, in the household. [Remember the 1880 census is the first census that recorded a relationship to the head of household.] No one considered the possibility that Anna and Bertha Schwartz were actually the Anna and Albertine in the 1860 and 1870 censuses. After all the information came from The Schindler Girls, they should know who their aunts and uncles are. Right?

Second Family Group Sheet 2 Mockup 1Second Joseph Schindler Family Group Sheet

A letter written to mom in 1991 contained the following questions5 her answers are in purple.6

  1. “About the picture of the Joseph Schindler family”[photograph of the Eight Schindler Siblings] Anna Swartz and “Bertha Schwartz (or is it Swartz?)” 
    “As far as Schwartz spelling, there is a question. We think it is the German spelling with the ‘ch’ included. My aunt recently spelled it Schwartz. In the copy of the obit of William Schindler you sent me [it] is spelled Schwartz.”  Note: By the time this letter was written only one of The Schindler Girls was still living, the youngest, Eleanor, and she was 90 years old.
  2. “…with respect to Joseph’s second wife – was her maiden name Ohnsorg (not Ohnesorg according to the Chaska phone book) and her previous married name Swartz?
    “The spelling of Ohnsorg (Ohnesorg) is really up for grabs.” “Again according to my aunt, Victoria’s maiden name was Ohnsorg (Ohnesorg) and the first husband was Schwartz.”
  3. “Did Victoria’s daughters, Anna and Bertha, get married? If so do you know the names of the their spouses?”
    “To our knowledge Anna & Bertha Schwartz never married. My aunt said they were never interested because they were not blood relatives.”
  4. “Do you have any info on Anna Schindler, on Albertine(a), and on John? Did any of them marry?”
    “Anna was born in 1845 according to the 1860 Census.” “She does not appear on the 1870 Census.” John born 3/12/1853 [12 March 1853] in Cleveland, Ohio and died at age 14 on 3/15/1867 [15 March 1867]. “I penciled in this information on your sheet. Albertine is shown as 8 years of age on the” 1860 census “and as Albertina age 17 on the” 1870 census.

All three of The Schindler Girls had died before the above letter and response were shared with me. When the correspondence was shared, I asked about Joseph’s second wife, Victoria. Mom and her sisters explained to me The Schindler Girls never understood why their grandfather married Victoria. They quoted my great-aunts, “Why did he marry that woman?” I have never been able to reconcile that quote. I simply do not understand the context. Was it that woman or just that woman?

Deaths Carolina Joseph & Victoria Mockup 1Death Records Carolina, Joseph & Victoria

Joseph’s wife Carolina died 1 July 18757 sixteen years before the oldest Schindler Girl, Afra was born. Three years after Carolina died Joseph married Victoria on 8 October 1878.8 Joseph died 18 October 19009 when the two oldest Schindler Girls were 9 and 8 years old and before the youngest, Eleanor was born. I am reasonably certain Afra and Hedwig had met their step-grandmother. I do not know if Eleanor ever met her. Victoria died in 190810 four days after Eleanor turned 7. I saw the last remaining Schindler Girl at a family reunion in Minnesota in August 1992. She would die the following year at the age of 92.11 I would not learn of The Schindler Girls feelings toward their step-grandmother until a couple of years later. I never had the opportunity to gain some clarification.

Reunion MockupSchindler Gestach Reunion 29 August 1992

I met my cousin Buffy at the Schindler–Gestach reunion in 1992. She had graduated high school just three years earlier. The genealogy bug bit her during that reunion and has never let go. She became a woman on a mission. Spending the next couple of years compiling the Schindler family history culminating in a self-published book, The Book of Schindler. The picture above of the eight Schindler siblings is the first page in Buffy’s book, labeled the way The Schindler Girls claimed. Buffy recorded Joseph’s second marriage on 8 October 1878 to Victoria Ohnsorg Schwartz.

Schindler Ohnsorg MockupThe marriage of Joseph N. Schindler to Victoria Ohnsorg nee Schmid

Joseph and Victoria’s marriage record shows Victoria’s name as Mrs. Victoria Ohnsorg. I do not think the original marriage record was seen by mom and her sisters or by Buffy. There is an index that was done by FamilySearch as part of their Vital Records Collection, and this collection appears to have been the source for the marriage date. The index does not include “Mrs.” Using just the index would not necessarily have raised any flags. After all, The Schindler Girls said her maiden name was Ohnsorg. (On a side note. Not only does the index not include a big clue but it also asserts the marriage took place in Carver County. Notice on the image that Carver County is lined out and replaced with Ramsey County. The license was issued in Carver County and returned to Carver County but the marriage occurred at the Third Catholic Cathedral in Saint Paul.)

The Ohnsorgs/Ohnesorgs

The Schindler Girls were the daughters of Maria (Mary) Margaretha Gstach (today Gestach) my great grandmother and William Schindler’s wife. See pedigree chart here  Mary was born 14 June 1860 in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota. Her parents were John Gstach and Afra Goldstein.12 Afra was the illegitimate daughter of Simon Goldstein and Margaretha Ohnsorg.13

Mary & Afra Baptismal RecordsAfra Goldstein & Mary Margaretha Gstach Baptismal Records

The Schindler Girls did pass on information about their mother and grandmother Afra. In a story, “History Of The Spinning Wheels” they write: “When grandmother Afra Gestach who was born on August 4, 1843, [Afra’s actual date of birth was 10 August 1842.]14 was eleven years of age she with her mother, Margaretha Schneider, came to America from Freihalden, (near Augsburg) Bavaria Germany.” It doesn’t appear that The Schindler Girls knew their great-grandmother was an Ohnsorg and that they were “blood related” to the Ohnsorgs. Margaretha married John George Schneider in 1855 probably in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.15 She died 5 June 189016 before any of The Schindler Girls were born. Before you ask, yes I will write a post about the spinning wheels.

In June of 1990 Mom and her sisters received a copy of part of a letter originally written in August 196817 and a family group sheet, titled Ohnsorg Family18 from Afra Mitchel. Afra Mitchel’s mother Anna Gstach Mitchel died when Afra was six days old.19 Afra’s grandmother Afra Goldstein Gestach raised her. The letter was originally sent to Mrs. James Dion from Karl Weichnmeier who wrote the book Freihalden published in 1978. The book is a history of Freihalden and includes a listing of all the owners of the houses in Freihalden beginning in the early 1700’s through the mid 1950’s. The information contained in the letter was obtained from Karl Weichnmeier’s research.

Letter Ohnsorg Family Group SheetPartial letter from Karl Weichnmeier & Ohnsorg Family Group Sheet

Eventually Afra Goldstein and her mother Margaretha Ohnsorg were found on a ships list.20

Ohnsorg Ship ListtOhnsorg Passenger List

Traveling together were: Xavier Ohnesorg, 34; Margaretha, age 39; Victoria, age 32; Afra, age 10; and Crescentia age 3. Well would you look at that! There is a Victoria Ohnesorg on the ship list. She must be the Victoria Ohnsorg who married the mysterious Mr. Schwartz and then Joseph Schindler, Sr. and so it was penciled in on the family group sheet. After all, The Schindler Girls said her maiden name was Ohnsorg. Right? Perhaps if the ships list was analyzed in conjunction with the Ohnsorg Family papers previously received and Joseph’s marriage record to Victoria the merging of the Victorias would have been caught.

In the fall of 1997 I started typing Buffy’s book, The Book of Schindler into my genealogy software. In an e-mail to Buffy21 I wrote:

“I have two different birthdays for Victoria Ohnsorg. The first was 5 March 1828 and the second was 23 December 1833.

The Victoria with the 1828 birthday is listed on a piece of paper that is called the Ohnsorg Family. I have my mother checking to see where it came from. This Victoria is also listed as “married a man by the name of Baer” 

What I am trying to figure out is[;] [A]re there two Victoria’s or is one of the birthdays wrong in which case she was married three times, instead of twice?”

Buffy responded to me that the 1833 date was from Victoria Schindler’s obituary. At the time I did not have a copy of the obituary and the mystery of the two dates of birth was placed on the back burner. Effectively keeping two Victoria’s merged as one.

1880 Schindler Census1880 US CENSUS Joseph Schindler Household

Five years later in 2003 I found Joseph and Victoria in the 1880 U. S. census and a few puzzle pieces started to fall into place. Victoria had been previously married to an Ohnsorg, not a Schwartz. Her daughter was Anna Ohnsorg and not Anna Schwartz as The Schindler Girls had claimed, plus she had a crippled son Mathias. I wrote an e-mail 30 July 200322 to my mom and her sisters.

“I have been transcribing census records for the Schindler side and sorting though some other material.

This is what I know so far the Victoria who married Joseph N Schindler was married to Xavier Ohnsorg her maiden name was Schugg. This is why there are so many birthdays for her. She was not married to a Schwartz. The two girls Anna Schwartz and Bertha Schwartz were Joseph and Carolina’s daughters Anna Schindler and Albertine Schindler. They both married Schwartz’ Yes, there was a Victoria Ohnsorg but she did not marry Joseph Schindler. It will take me a couple of days to sort this all out and make the corrections to the database.”

This e-mail marks when the third Victoria Ohnsorg enters the picture. If you recall I was theorizing that there were two Victoria Ohnsorgs because of the two dates of birth. Thinking I had found the evidence for two Victorias I sent the e-mail to my mom and her sisters. My database was changed. Little did I know it would turn out that what I really had found was a third Victoria Ohnsorg, whose maiden name was Schugg and she was not the one who married Joseph Schindler.

The 1880 census did allow me to correctly identify the women in the Schindler Siblings photograph, sort of. As was revealed in my last post here.  It would take another fifteen years to discover Anna was not Carolina’s daughter but was Joseph’s daughter from a previous relationship.

On The Road

Motorhome mockupAnn’s Research Mobile

In 2008 I purchased my motor home and went on the road researching full-time. I was finally able to spend weeks or months in a location researching gathering evidence. That first year I spent most of the summer in Minnesota where I met my research buddy Lois. Over the years she has become a great friend and my go to person. We often bounce theories or ideas about our research off each other. I spent winters in Arizona correlating and analyzing what I had found in the summer. Once I started researching full-time, making opportunities to attend genealogy conferences and taking classes my skills increased exponentially.

During the summer of 2008 I spent a lot of time at the Carver County Historical Society in Waconia, Minnesota, at various court houses in Minnesota and the Minnesota Historical Society (MHS) in Saint Paul. At that time Lois was a volunteer at the Carver County Historical Society. I don’t know how many newspaper articles were scanned but it was several hundred. There were several trips to MHS. I had stacks of death certificates and a number of court records to go along with the newspaper articles. I was going to be busy come winter. It was during this time period when I decided a “Do-Over” was in order. Go back through all the information I had and really analyze it for the first time.

Obits Joseph SchindlerJoseph Schindler Obituary and Death Notice

Winter 2008–2009

By this time I had figured out Victoria was not a Schwartz and she had married an Ohnsorg prior to her marriage to Joseph. Census searches had become a whole lot easier. That winter in Arizona I remember telling Lois on the phone “With all the censuses online I really need to find the ones I am missing.” “It should help me figure out the Victoria Ohnsorg Schwartz Schindler mess.” The search began. Between the letter from Karl Weichnmeier in Germany, newspaper articles, death records, census records plus the records I had found in 2007 on my trip to Germany I was able to piece the Ohnsorg family together. It would turn out that there were three Victoria Ohnsorgs all in the same family, one by birth and two by marriage.

Macar Ohnesorg 1786–185423 and his second wife Walburga Egelhofer 1786–185324 had eleven children, four died as infants,25 another the oldest Stephen died at the age of 31 in Germany.26 The remaining 6 immigrated to America. They were:

1.  Margaretha Ohnsorg (1813–1890)27 married George Schneider (about 1806–)28 about 1855 probably in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.29

2.  Xavier Ohnsorg (1820–1896)30 he married Victoria Schugg (1829–1905)31 24 August 1857 in Dahlgren Township, Carver County, Minnesota.32

3.  Victoria Ohnsorg (1822–1908)33 she married Gottlieb Baer (1822–1890)34 about 1855 probably in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.35

4.  Sebastian Ohnsorg (1824–1875)36 he married Victoria Schmid (1831–1908)37 30 May 1854 in Inningen, Bayern, Germany.38

5.  Crescentia Ohnsorg (1829–1893)39 she married Phillip Siegle (1821–1897)40 27 October 1854 in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.41

6.  Genevieve Ohnsorg (1831–1905)42 she married three times. The first Ferdinand Wels (about 1821–1863)43 27 October 1854 in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.44 The second was to Jacob Bueche (1828–1881)45 in about 186446 and the third was Peter Kimmel (1834–1887)47 on 10 July 1882 in Carver County, Minnesota.48

A Refresher on Joseph & Victoria

Joseph Schindler married Mrs. Victoria Ohnsorg 8 October 1878.49 They were found in the 1880 census in Chaska with the following children:50

Name Age Relationship to head of household
 Mathias Ohnsorg 23 Step Son
Ann Ohnsorg 16 Step Daughter
Paul Schindler 14 Son

Children in the U. S. 1880 census in the Joseph Schindler household.

What about the other Victoria’s? Xavier and his wife Victoria are also residing in Chaska in 1880 with their four children.51 Eliminating Victoria Schugg as Joseph’s second wife. Victoria Ohnsorg and her husband Gottlieb Baer are residing in Dora, Otter Tail County, Minnesota in 1880 with their youngest son52 and she is an Ohnsorg by birth eliminating her. One Victoria Ohnsorg, the wife of Sebastian remains. Sebastian died 25 September 187553 almost three months after Joseph’s wife Carolina. Sebastian’s wife, Victoria is the most likely second wife of Joseph.

Ohnsorgs CensusOhnsorg family, 1860, 1870, & 1870 US Census’s

Victoria in the 1860–1880 censuses and ages.

1860 1870 1875 1880
Town of Carver Town of Dalgren Town of Dalgren Chaska
Sebastian, 33 Sebasian, 44 Sebastian,52
Victoria, 28 Victoria, 35 Victoria , 42 Victoria, 49
Mathias, 4 Math, 15 Mathias, 19 Mathias, 23
Jane age 1 Geneovefe, 11 Geneovefa, 16
Anna M, 5 Mary, 11 Anna, 16
Jacob, 2 Jac., 7

Table of the 1860–1880 U. S. and Minnesota State censuses for Victoria.54

Victoria’s age is relatively consistent across all the census years as are Mathias’s. Mariana/Anna’s age is also consistent. Her name fluctuates with variations of the name Mary Anna. In 1880 Genevieve age 21 is residing with her Aunt Genevieve and her second husband Jacob Beshe [Bueche].55 That explains why she is not living with her mother; Jacob age 13 is living next door to his mother boarding with John and Mary Kaufmann;56 and explaining why he is not living with his mother. The evidence clearly supports the assertion Sebastian Ohnsorg’s wife Victoria nee Schmid was Joseph Schindler’s second wife.

Obit Victoria Schmid SchindlerVictoria nee Schmid Schindler obituary and death notice

Victoria’s obituary contains the final piece of evidence. “In 1868, and after they [Sebastian and Victoria] had sold the business they moved onto their farm in Dahlgren, where her husband died in 1875. She remained on the farm until 1878, when she was married to Joseph Schindler.”57

Final Thoughts
Should we just toss out all those old family group sheets? Perish the thought. Should we accept them hook line and sinker? Definitely not! But we do need to analyze the sheets for accuracy and compare them with actual records. Whenever we find new information it is imperative that we go back and look at what has come before. It just might save you from years of confusion and incorrectly identified ancestors. Have you found all the censuses for your direct lines and at a minimum their siblings? You just might find the answer to break through a brick wall.

One More:
Shortly after I wrote my last post I received an e-mail from my cousin Dan. The subject was Victoria Ohnsorg? The e-mail:58

“Why isn’t Victoria Ohnsorg in your tree at ancestry.com? I had her in my tree as the second wife of Jos. Nicholas Schindler, married in 1860.  But that can’t be correct, because Carolina Lux lived until 1875.”

I had to stop laughing before I could respond, my fingers keep hitting the wrong keys. I wrote,

“Victoria Ohnsorg is really Victoria Schmid sometimes written as Schmidt. Her first marriage was to Sebastian Ohnsorg who was the brother to Margaretha Ohnsorg who was the mother to Afra Goldstein, Wilhelm Schindler’s mother in-law. Maybe her story should be my next blog post… There were three woman named “Victoria Ohnsorg” whom for years had been magically transformed into two women.

Something like How Two Victoria Ohnsorgs Were Really Three.”

Dan’s response, “I’d read that.”

And a blog post was born. This post is dedicated to you Dan!


RELATED ARTICLES:
When You Get It WRONG Not Once, Not Twice But Three Times!


  1. Stearns County, Minnesota, Birth Record 1891–1898, page 47, line 1, Schindler Afra Caroline, born 9 January 1891. second image, p. 11; FHL microfilm 1309458, frames 19–20. The page number and line number is not an actual “page” they appear to be a reference to the township records. Stearns County, Minnesota, Birth Record 1891–1898, page 53, line 3 , Schindler Hedwig Louise, born 24 December 1891; FHL microfilm 1309458, frames 21–22. The page number and line number is not an actual “page” they appear to be a reference to the township records. Minnesota Department of Health, birth certificate, no. DC-75100, Eleanor Marie Schindler, 20 February 1901; digital image of certificate, “Minnesota Birth Certificate Index” (intranet database available on-site: accessed 2 August 2008); Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul. This is a delayed birth record. 
  2. Carver County, Minnesota, Marriage License Record, vol. D, p. 117, marriage of Peter Schwartz & Albertine Schindler, 22 October 1872; Carver County, Government Center, Chaska; FHL microfilm 1434896. Scott County, Minnesota, Marriage Records, vol. B, p. 131, marriage of John Schwartz & Anna Schindler, 10 September 1868; FHL microfilm 1379415. 
  3. 1860 U. S. census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Chanhassen, p.360 (penned), dwelling 637, family 556, Joseph Schindler household; NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 567. 
  4. 1870 U. S. census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Town of Chanhassen, p. 108 (penned), dwelling & family 177, Joseph Schindler household; NARA microfilm publication T132, roll 2. 
  5. Dick Muyres (Rochester, Minnesota) to Pat Gilchrest (Pleasanton, California), Letter, 31 October 1991. Privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2018. 
  6. Pat Gilchrest (Pleasanton, California) to Dick Muyres (Rochester, Minnesota), Letter, 12 March 1992. Privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2018. 
  7. Guardian Angels Catholic Church (Chaska, Minnesota), Burial Register 1862–1969, p. 9, entry no. 7, Carolina Schindler, 1875; Archdiocese of Saint Paul & Minneapolis microfilm, Church of Guardian Angels, Marriages 1862-1992, Deaths 1862-1992, roll 61, Carver County Historical Society, Waconia, Minnesota. 
  8. Guardian Angels Catholic Church (Chaska, Minnesota), Burial Register 1862–1969, p. 39, 21st entry, Joseph Schindler, 1900; Archdiocese of Saint Paul & Minneapolis microfilm, Church of Guardian Angels, Marriages 1862-1992, Deaths 1862-1992, roll 61, Carver County Historical Society, Waconia, Minnesota. 
  9. Carver County, Minnesota, Marriage License Record, vol. D, p. 723, no. 1672, entry for Joseph Schindler & Mrs. Victoria Onhsorg, married 8 October 1878; Carver County Government Center, Chaska. 
  10. Minnesota Department of Health, death certificate, no. 1908-MN-004740, Victoria Schindler; MHS microfilm 1908 roll 3 (Certificates 4103-6189), Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul. 
  11. Minnesota Department of Health, death certificate, Eleanor Schindler, 16 September 1993; Copy of original, Schindler Family Documents, privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, SD, 2018. 
  12. Guardian Angels Catholic Church (Chaska, Minnesota), “Baptismal Register 1859–1880”, p. 2 & 3, entry 18, Maria Margaretha Gstach (1860); Parish rectory. 
  13. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1837–1870, p. 011, no. 72, Afra Goldstein baptism 10 August 1842; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 3. Also available on FHL microfilm 829504. 
  14. Ibid. 
  15. Patentee George Snyder, Warrantee William Temple Cole, Private (Captain McCullochs Company Texas Volunteers, War with Mexico), bounty land warrant file, no. 90128; Military Bounty Land Warrants and Related Papers; Records of the Bureau of Land Management, Record Group 49; National Archives, Washington, D.C. In the Pre-Emption Proof the following can be found; “Applicant moved into said house with his family consisting of a wife on the 29th day of October A.D. 1855.” Xavier Ohnesorg, Margaretha’s brother offered proof in support of George Synder (sic). 
  16. Carver County, Minnesota, Death Records, vol. A, unpaginated, line 7, entry for Margaretha Schneider; Taxpayer Services Department, Chaska. 
  17. Karl Weichnmeier to Mrs. James Dion, copy of letter, August 1968; Schindler Family Files; privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2018. A copy of the letter was passed from Mrs. James Dion to Afra Mitchel to Mom to Ann C Gilchrest. 
  18. Author Unknown, “Ohnsorg Family,” supplied by Afra Mitchel, deceased, 1990; Schindler Family Files; privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. There are no sources for the specific pieces of information. 
  19. Mrs. Peter Michels funeral card, cites maiden birth, marriage & death dates, last sacraments received after enduring a punishing disease; Funeral Artifacts, privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2018. This printed, two-sided, written in German, black border 2 5/8″ x 4″ funeral mass card was passed from niece of deceased, Eleanor Marie Schindler (1901–1993) to her niece, Virginia (Schindler) McQuade (1926– ) to the current owner in 2007. 
  20. Manifest, Scioto, 28 June 1854, list 786, line 283–287, entry for the Ohnesorg family; “New York Passenger Lists, 1820–1957,” digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 June 2018); citing “Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820–1897,” NARA publication M237, roll 141. 
  21. Ann C Gilchrest to Buffy Schwalbe, e-mail, 1 September 1997, “Victoria Ohnsorg,” Schindler Family Files; privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2018. 
  22. Ann C Gilchrest to Mom & others, e-email, 30 July 2003, “Joseph Schindler & Victoria Ohnesorg who is not,” Schindler Family Files; privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2018. 
  23. Saint Peter und Paul Katholische Kirche (Ried, Germany), Taufens, 1759–1879, p. 021, Macar Ohnesorg baptism 2 January 1786; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Reid bei Jettingen, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Totes, 1835–1877, p. 095, Macar Ohnesorg died 24 February 1854; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 3. 
  24. Mariä Himmelfahrt Katholische Kirche (Scheppach, Germany), Taufens, & Heiraten, 1751–1798, p. 133, baptism, Walburga Egelhofer, 9 July 1786; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Scheppach, rolle 2, neue Bdnr. 5. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Totes, 1835–1877, p. 095, Walburga Ohnesorg died 19 October 1853; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 3. 
  25. Maria Anna Ohnsorg 1816–1816. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 42–43, Maria Anna Ohnesorg baptism 2 January 1816; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Totes, 1788–1835, p. 159–160, Maria Anna Ohnesorg died 24 February 1816; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Crescentia 1817–1821. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 46–47, Crecentia Ohnesorg baptism 7 June 1817; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Totes, 1788–1835, p. 171–172, Crescentia Ohnesorg died 17 February 1821; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Maria 1819–1821. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 52–53, Maria Ohnesorg baptism 30 January 1819; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Totes, 1788–1835, p. 173–174, Maria Ohnesorg died 6 March 1821; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Paul 1826–1826. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 74–75, Paul Ohnesorg baptism 17 January 1826; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Totes, 1788–1835, p. 187–188, Paul Ohnesorg died 29 January 1826; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. 
  26. Stephen 1811–1843. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 30–31, Stephan Ohnesorg baptism 15 December 1811; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Totes, 1835–1877, p. 80, Stephan Ohnesorg died 28 July 1843; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 3. 
  27. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 036, Margaretha Ohnesorg baptism 1 November 1813; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Carver County, Minnesota, Death Records, vol. A, unpaginated, line 7, entry for Margaretha Schneider; Taxpayer Services Department, Chaska. 
  28. George Schneider was born about 1806 per the 1860 census. Family lore claims he went west for the Gold Rush and was never heard from again. 1860 U.S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Chaska, p. 325 (penned), dwelling 309, family 278, George Schneider household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2003); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 567. 
  29. Patentee George Snyder, Warrantee William Temple Cole, Private (Captain McCullochs Company Texas Volunteers, War with Mexico), bounty land warrant file, no. 90128; Military Bounty Land Warrants and Related Papers; Records of the Bureau of Land Management, Record Group 49; National Archives, Washington, D.C. In the Pre-Emption Proof the following can be found; “Applicant moved into said house with his family consisting of a wife on the 29th day of October A.D. 1855.” Xavier Ohnesorg, Margaretha’s brother offered proof in support of George Synder (sic). On page 99 of the Ramsey County, Minnesota Marriage Record vol. 2, 1 June 1863–8 January 1855. The following is written: “(Marriage Certificates for 1855, 1856 & 1857 &c lost by Clerk…G.W. Prescott — They were taken to his house to be recorded & then lost. — Mr Hough, late acting clk. states this to e the reason why record is not to be found) Oct 1/66. Both of Margaretha’s younger sisters where married in Ramsey County in 1854. Suggesting that Margaretha was also married there. 
  30. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 58–59, Xavier Ohnesorg baptism 29 October 1820; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. “Obituary [Xavier Ohnsorg],” The Weekly Valley Herald (Chaska, Minnesota), 23 January 1896, p. 5, col. 1; Newspaper microfilm; roll Chaska Valley Herald (Weekly) Jan 2, 1896–Dec 31, 1896; Carver County Historical Society, Waconia, Minnesota. 
  31. Klosterbeuren Catholic Parish (Bezirksamt Illertissen, Bavaria, Germany), Sacramental Register 1803–1833, p. 60–61, entry for Victoria Schugg, 19 August 1829; FHL microfilm 815882 item 2. Victoria, born in Munich in maternity hospital, father not listed, mother Anna Schugg, maid residence Klosterbeuren no. 54, born 19 August 1829, at 4 in the morning baptized 19 August 1829 at Munich, left for America in April 1857. Her brother John Schugg’s baptismal record records their father as Jakob Zucker single, protestant. Klosterbeuren Catholic Parish (Bezirksamt Illertissen, Bavaria, Germany), Sacramental Register 1803-1833, p. 56-57, entry for Johann Schugg, 20 February 1828; FHL microfilm 815882 item 2. Carver County, Minnesota, Death Records, vol. D, p. 198, no. 1, entry for Victoria Ohnsorg, died 4 February 1905; Carver County Government Center, Chaska. 
  32. “Celebrate Their Golden Wedding Mr. and Mrs. John Schugg Were Married Fifty Years, Monday,” The Weekly Valley Herald (Chaska, Minnesota), 29 August 1907, p. 1; Newspaper microfilm; roll Chaska Valley Herald (Weekly) Jan 3, 1907–Dec 26, 1907; Carver County Historical Society, Waconia, Minnesota. The marriage license for this marriage would have been filed in Ramsey County and it probably part of the lost certificates mentioned above. 
  33. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 64–65, Victoria Ohnesorg baptism 31 October 1822; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Minnesota Department of Health, death certificate, no. 1908-MN-000338, Victoria Baer; MHS microfilm 1908 roll 1 (Certificates 1-2122), Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul. 
  34. Find A Grave, digital images (https://findagrave.com : accessed 16 June 2018), entry for Johann Gottlieb Baer (10 April 1822–28 August 1890), Memorial no. 89452925, created by ckp75 (contributor 47007002); Sacred Heart Cemetery, Frazee, Becker County, Minnesota, USA. Photograph © ckp75. 
  35. This marriage would have been recorded in Ramsey County. The license and certificate is likely part of the records lost. On page 99 of the Ramsey County, Minnesota Marriage Record vol. 2, 1 June 1863–8 January 1855. The following is written: “(Marriage Certificates for 1855, 1856 & 1857 &c lost by Clerk…G.W. Prescott — They were taken to his house to be recorded & then lost. — Mr Hough, late acting clk. states this to be the reason why record is not to be found) Oct 1/[18]66.” Both of Margaretha’s younger sisters were married in Ramsey County in 1854. Suggesting that Margaretha was also married there. 
  36. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 68–69, Sebastian Ohnesorg baptism 10 January 1824; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Carver County, Minnesota, Death Records, vol. A, p. 017, line 17, no. 15, entry for Sebastian Ohnsorg, died 29 September 1875; Carver County Government Center, Chaska. 
  37. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1829–1837, p. 123–124, Viktoria Schmid baptism 26 December 1831; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. FHL microfilm 1,979,991, item 6. Minnesota Department of Health, death certificate, no. 1908-MN-004740, Victoria Schindler; MHS microfilm 1908 roll 3 (Certificates 4103-6189), Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul. 
  38. Saint Peter und Paul Katholische Kirche (Innigen, Germany), Heiraten, 1807–1869, p. 55, Sebastian Ohnsorg & Victoria Schmidt, 30 May 1854; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Innigen (jetzt Augsburg-Inningen), rolle 3, neue Bdnr. 6. Also available on FHL microfilm 579,331. 
  39. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1788–1829, p. 84–85, Crescentia Ohnesorg baptism 16 June 1829; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Old Saint Nickolas Cemetery (Carver, Carver County Minnesota), Creszentia Siegle gravestone; photographed by Ann C Gilchrest, 30 June 2010. A cross vault obelisk inscription Creszentia Siegle geb. 16 Juni 1829 gest. 5 Nov 1893. 
  40. Find A Grave, database (https://findagrave.com : accessed 16 June 2018), entry for Philipp Siegle (21 February 1821–4 October 1897), Memorial no. 53357214, created by Jeffrey C. (contributor 46935377); citing Mount Hope Cemetery, Carver, Carver County, Minnesota, USA. 
  41. Ramsey County, Minnesota, Marriage Record, vol. 2, 1 June 1853–8 January 1855, p. 82, Phillip Seakla (sic) to Grasans (sic) Ohnesort (sic), 27 October 1854; FHL microfilm 1314545. 
  42. Mariä Verkündigung Katholische Kirche (Freihalden, Germany), Taufens, 1829-1837, p. 121-122, Genevieve Ohnesorg baptism 1 January 1831; Archive des Bistums Augsburg, Germany, microfilm Pfarrei Freihalden, rolle 1, neue Bdnr. 2. Carver County, Minnesota, Records Deaths, vol. D, p. 140, no. 2, Geneveva (sic) Kimmel, 6 October 1905 FHL microfilm 1434715. Father M. Ohnsorg. 
  43. Find A Grave, digital images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 16 June 2018), photograph of gravestone for Ferdinand Wels (–4 February 1863, age 45), Memorial No. 53357279, created by Jeffrey C, contributor no. 53357279; citing Mount Hope Cemetery, Carver, Carver County, Minnesota. Photograph © Jeffrey C. 
  44. Ramsey County, Minnesota, Marriage Record, vol. 2, 1 June 1853–8 January 1855, p. 81, Ferdinand Wels (sic) to Genefefa (sic) Ohnesach (sic), 27 October 1854. FHL microfilm 1314545. 
  45. Old Saint Nickolas Cemetery (Carver, Carver County, Minnesota), Peter Kimmel gravestone; photographed by Ann C Gilchrest, 27 June 2010. Tablet marker, inscription Peter Kimmel im jahr 1834 Gest. d. 4 Nov. 1887. 
  46. Calculated marriage year Ferdinand Wels died 4 October 1854. Find A Grave, digital images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 16 June 2018), photograph of gravestone for Ferdinand Wels (–4 February 1863, age 45), Memorial No. 53357279, created by Jeffrey C, contributor no. 53357279; citing Mount Hope Cemetery, Carver, Carver County, Minnesota. Photograph © Jeffrey C. Jacob and Genevieve are married in the 1865 Minnesota State census. 1865 Minnesota State Census, Carver County, population schedule, Carver, p. 3, family 26, Jacob Busche [Bueche] household; digital image 2, “Minnesota, Territorial and State Census, 1849-1905,” Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 December 2011); citing MHS microfilm Minnesota 1865 State Census, roll 1. 
  47. Saint Nickolas Cemetery (Carver, Carver County, Minnesota), Jacob Bueche gravestone; photographed by Ann C Gilchrest, 27 June 2010. Large cross marker with a square base, inscription Jacob Bueche geb. 25 Juli 1828 gest 24 Aug. 1881. 
  48. Carver County, Minnesota, Marriage License Record, vol. E , p. 453, marriage of Peter Kimmel & Genoveva Bueche, 10 July 1882; Carver County, Government Center, Chaska; FHL microfilm 1434897. 
  49. Carver County, Minnesota, Marriage License Record, vol. D, p. 723, no. 1672, entry for Joseph Schindler & Mrs. Victoria Ohnsorg, married 8 October 1878; Carver County Government Center, Chaska. 
  50. 1880 U. S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Chaska, Enumeration District (ED) 89, p. 239B (stamped), dwelling 131, family 139, Joseph Schindler Sr., household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 616. 
  51. 1880 U. S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Chaska, Enumeration District (ED) 89, p. 245A (stamped), family 8, Xavier Onsorg (sic) household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 616. 
  52. 1880 U. S. Census, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 158, p. 110B (stamped), dwelling & family 18, Gotleib Bear household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 628. 
  53. Carver County, Minnesota, Death Records, vol. A, p. 017, line 17, no. 15, entry for Sebastian Ohnsorg, died 29 September 1875; Carver County Government Center, Chaska. 
  54. 1860 U. S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Caver, p. 295 (penned), dwelling 32 family 24, Sebastian Onsorgh (sic) household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 567. 1865 Minnesota State Census, Carver County, population schedule, Carver, p.. 2, family 17, Sebastian Ohnsorg household; digital image, “Minnesota, Territorial and State Census, 1849-1905,” Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing MHS microfilm Minnesota 1865 State Census, roll 1. Ages are not included in the 1865 census. 1870 U. S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Dahlgren Township, p. 134 (penned), dwelling 11, family 12, Sebastin (sic) Ohnsorg household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication T132, roll 2. 1875 Minnesota State Census, Carver County, population schedule, Dahlgren, p. 229 (penned), family 110, Sebastian Ohnsorg household; digital image, “Minnesota, Territorial and State Census, 1849-1905,” Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing MHS microfilm Minnesota 1875 State Census, roll 5. 1880 U. S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Chaska, Enumeration District (ED) 89, p. 239B (stamped), dwelling 131, family 139, Joseph Schindler Sr., household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 616. 
  55. 1880 U. S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Carver, Enumeration District (ED) 90, p. 239B (stamped), dwelling & family 33, Jacob Beshe (sic)household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 616. 
  56. 1880 U. S. Census, Carver County, Minnesota, population schedule, Chaska, Enumeration District (ED) 89, p. 239B (stamped), dwelling 130 family 138, John Kaufmann., household; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2018); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 616. 
  57. “The late Mrs. Victoria Schindler,” The Weekly Valley Herald (Chaska, Minnesota), 19 March 1908, p. 8, col. 2; Newspaper microfilm; Carver County Historical Society, Waconia, Minnesota. 
  58. Dan Miller to Ann C Gilchrest, e-mail, 9 June 2018, “Victoria Ohnsorg?,” Schindler Family Files; privately held by Ann C Gilchrest, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2018. 

3 thoughts on “The Story of the Victoria Ohnsorgs How Three Women Became Two, Then One and How They Became Three Again. Which One Was Joseph Schindler’s Second Wife and Third Partner?

  1. I am honored, dear cousin.

    Thank you.

    Dan

    PS. The graphics are over-the-top spectacular, and the posting is as usual fascinating for anyone interested in accurate genealogy — family member or not.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. tschwartz1935wowwaycom

    I am surprised to find that comments I left earlier are missing. I must not have saved them properly. I just offer more praise for your outstanding series of family history projects. I am in awe of their fast pace and high quality. The blog is a great medium for this, providing maximum freedom to tell the stories the way they should be told. I concur that you’re lucky to have had older relatives who cared to save this information even if it didn’t turn out to be correct. It started you on a fascinating search. And I second the praise for our stimulating cousin Dan. BTW Ann, that was a terrific hairdo you had for your 1957 road trip.

    Like

Comments are closed.